Aram Bartholl – Blog

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In the meanwhile on Instagram …

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Maddecent.com fans on Instagram like very much the DVD Deaddrop install it seems. :)) and Dismagazine.com too :))))

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June 7th, 2014 at 9:57 pm

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DOWNLOAD HERE!!

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In case you missed the DVD Dead Drop install at the Museum of Moving Image last year visit the show Hyper-Resemblances up at Wallach gallery right now. I am showing a documentation of the DVD Dead Drop install there and you are invitved to DOWNLOAD ALL 10 DVD Volumes from a local hard drive to your computer! Quick quick, before the show is over!!

HYPER-RESEMBLANCES
at Wallach Art Gallery, Columbia University NYC
April 22–June 7, 2014

curated by Alison Coplan
with: Aram Bartholl, BFFA3AE, Nicolas Ceccaldi, Petra Cortright, Aleksandra Domanović, Marisa Olson, Hito Steyerl and Ryan Trecartin.

An exhibition in three parts, Hyper-resemblances explores how both modern and contemporary artists have experimented with different notions of representation as filtered through psychological, mechanical and digital lenses. In interchanges between embodied vision and the external world across various media, the grouping of works focuses on relationships between subjectivity, image production and reality. This show examines the role of the artist in reflecting and shaping images of both the self and “society.” Through modes of conceptual self-portraiture, montage and digital mediation, these artists subjectively construct contemporary consciousness. Hyper-resemblances is curated by Alison Coplan, Heidi Hirschl, and Kathleen Langjahr.  It is the second presentation of the MODA Curates series—an annual opportunity offered by The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery and the MA in Modern Art: Critical and Curatorial Studies Program (MODA) for outstanding curatorial proposals related to students’ theses. Coined by Jacques Rancière, the term “hyper-resemblance” deftly embodies the theoretical underpinnings of each curator’s project: it refers to an image that refuses to be defined by the reality in which it resides and, rather, establishes its origin and interior identity in the pursuit of a truer vision. Alison Coplan’s REALITY FX explores how artists both create and expose constructions of reality, mediated by the digital technology with which we experience the world. These works challenge the concept of a hegemonic reality put forward by modern media industries and demonstrate how existing power dynamics can be rearranged when artistic subjectivity engages with these technologies. The artists featured here are: Aram Bartholl, BFFA3AE, Nicolas Ceccaldi, Petra Cortright, Aleksandra Domanović, Marisa Olson, Hito Steyerl and Ryan Trecartin.

The Wallach Art Gallery is located on the eighth floor of Schermerhorn Hall on Columbia’s Morningside Heights campus, 116th Street and Broadway, in Manhattan. The gallery is free and open to the public from Wednesday through Saturday, 1- 5 pm. For more information, call 212-854-2877 or visit columbia.edu/cu/Wallach.

 

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May 16th, 2014 at 10:35 am

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VIRII – a DVD full of viruses

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I always wanted to make this DVD! During deaddrops.com people warned there could be viruses on the USB drive! Yes, there could be! But now, look! Here is a DVD full of viruses (and artefacts of their history) OMG!! ;)))

VIRII
DVD Dead Drop vol. 8
at the Museum of Moving Image
June 26–July 30, 2013
by Aram Bartholl

“VIRII examines the history and aesthetics, real and imagined, of the computer virus. The volume, a full 4.7GB, includes more than 30,000 actual computer viruses in a password-protected folder, video documentation of nearly a dozen computer viruses, a selection of articles about historically significant viruses, and a gallery of virus clip art.

Viruses, software programs named for their nefarious ability to self-replicate, captured the public’s imagination in the 1980s as personal computers became widely adopted. Viruses of this era would often lie dormant until certain days, when they would activate and create a visible disturbance on screen or erase parts of a computer’s hard drive.

By contrast, today’s viruses are designed to be invisible: hijacking computer resources to send unsolicited email, mask a criminal’s tracks, wage denial-of-service attacks, or spy on the user. Once the domain of tech-savvy pranksters and mischievous hackers, today viruses serve as lucrative tools for economic fraud and weapons regularly deployed for espionage and cyber warfare.”

 

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June 26th, 2013 at 11:13 am

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‘Home Entertainment’

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I am very pleased to announce the latest DVD vol.4  for the install at the MMI. Was fun to dig through big stacks of DVDs to make this 78 chapters video DVD. Enjoy! :)

‘Home Entertainment’ Aram Bartholl. 2012, 31 mins. video DVD.
DVD Dead Drop vol.4 at the Museum of Moving Image, NYC
December 7, 2012–January 31, 2013

The reign of the DVD is over, and with it the era of the extra. Before home entertainment was streamed from the cloud, movies came on DVDs that contained more than just the featured attraction. Studios added bonus content like behind-the-scenes documentaries and audio commentaries to make DVDs more desirable to consumers.

But DVDs also came with undesirable extras that were universally frustrating to captive audiences waiting for their movie to begin: unskippable content. Trailers for upcoming movies, promotional spots, and other unwanted clips all found their way immovably in front of featured attractions.

Home Entertainment is a collection of media found on DVDs from around the world that you always wanted to skip, but couldn’t: international copyright warnings, home entertainment publisher logos, studio and distributor bumpers, anti-piracy propaganda, and more. This time, however, all the clips are chaptered, so you can finally skip them.

 

 

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December 10th, 2012 at 11:37 am

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Let’s Play Max Payne

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The 3rd volume of the DVD Dead Drop is featuring massive 18 hours of Let’s play Max Payne. It ll launch next week Tuesday 30th. If you haven t got hold of ‘INSERT DISC‘ yet make sure to stop by at the museum on the weekend!

Let’s Play Max Payne
vol. 3 of the DVD Dead Drop
at Museum of the Moving Image, 36-01 35 Avenue, Astoria, NY 11106
October 30 –December 3, 2012

Eighteen hours of ‘Let’s Play’ Max Payne walkthrough videos on DVD

Three players—Tetraninja, AMF1534, and TehNevs—provide commentary while playing Max Payne 1, 2, and 3 from start to finish. Enjoy 4.5 GB and 60 video files of intense game-play action, hilarious comments, and compelling story-mode cut scenes.

The video game series Max Payne, which premiered in 2001, represents an important milestone in gaming history. Initially developed by the Finnish game studio Remedy, this third-person shooter won acclaim for its strong storyline and film noir scenarios coupled with its unique use of “bullet time” slow motion effects and advanced character controls. Through a large number of cut scenes and off-screen narration, the game tells the classic story of a revenge-driven cop in an experience at the intersection of cinema and game. In the latest title Max Payne 3, developed by Rockstar Games, the broke ex-cop Max once again causes more problems than he solves. Famous for high quality storytelling and hilarious cynical humor, Rockstar delivers another groundbreaking third-person game/film hybrid.

“Let’s Play” originated on Something Awful forums in 2006 as screen shot walkthroughs of video games before also coming to describe screen capture videos of game walkthroughs. Instead of playing a game oneself, the viewer watches someone else play, a common gesture in gaming culture. As CPUs and screen capture software became more powerful, Let’s Play developed into a widespread entertainment form. Many Let’s Play enthusiasts have attracted large numbers of subscribers on YouTube and frequently play several games for large audiences.

As Max Payne already possesses many cinematic qualities, the Let’s Play version of the game adds another layer of experience. The common third-person game perspective is heightened by a fourth person: the commenting player. Through multiple pairs of eyes, the viewer can relax and watch the action take place from a double over the shoulder view.

Aram Bartholl 2012

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October 26th, 2012 at 11:10 am

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INSERT DISC

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We are very excited to present INSERT DISC. It was a great adventure to travel back in time to free sunken art treasures
guarded by Moore’s monster octopus on a sunken MacOS7.We hope you will enjoy this travel as we did! Get the DISC at MMI, NYC, any time, for FREE!

INSERT DISC
Selected CD-ROM art of the 90’s on DVD

September 22 – October 27, 2012
at DVD Dead Drop, Museum of Moving Image NYC

curated by Aram Bartholl & Robert Sakrowski (curatingyoutube.com)

The second DVD Dead Drop volume INSERT DISC, features several classic art CD-ROMs from the mid-90s on DVD. While the web was still in its infancy, artists from a wide range of fields explored the possibilities of interactivity and multimedia on CD-ROMs, fancy new silver discs that held an unbelievable 650 megabytes of data. Today most of these pre-web multimedia works are no longer accessible because they require legacy operating systems and software to run. INSERT DISC offers the full experience of a cutting edge, mid-90s operating system packed with stunning multimedia art. Each DVD comes with a safe-to-install virtualized Ubuntu Linux operating system running an emulated Mac OS 7.6. In addition to the historic CD-ROM art, special features include historic browsers, link lists, and more, guaranteeing a true 1995 computer experience!

artist/projects:

Anti Rom
SASS Collective: Andy Allenson, Joel Baumann, Andy Cameron, Rob LeQuesne, Luke Pendrell, Sophie Pendrell, Andy Polaine, Anthony Rogers, Nik Roope, Tom Roope, Joe Stephenson, Jason Tame
CD-Rom, 1995

Manuscript
Eric Lanz, CD-Rom 1994

Cyberflesh Girlmonster
Linda Dement, CD-Rom 1995

User Unfriendly Interface
Josephine Starrs & Leon Cmielewski, first shown 1994, CD-Rom 1996

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Extra 90’s specials:
Browser collection, ‘Einblicke ins Internet’ offline Internet CD-Rom, Bookmark easter eggs & more

credits:
Andreas Broeckmann, Sandra Fauconnier, nbk Berlin, ZKM Karlsruhe, Transmediale archive

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Anti Rom
1995, CD-Rom, http://www.antirom.com/
SASS Collective: Andy Allenson, Joel Baumann, Andy Cameron, Rob LeQuesne, Luke Pendrell, Sophie Pendrell, Andy Polaine, Anthony Rogers, Nik Roope, Tom Roope, Joe Stephenson, Jason Tame
self-published and funded by the Arts Council of Great Britain.

“Offering a highly interactive interface to the collected sounds and images, this work is an exploration of the limits of what the CD-ROM medium can actually handle. Andy Cameron: “Antirom offers a radical critique of the poverty of contemporary multimedia in a number of savagely ironic, absurdist and incisive satires. Antirom is specifically against the ill conceived grafting of point-and-click functions onto traditional linear forms. Antirom is for the development of a new language of representation, and new modes of spectatorship, within the new apparatus of interactivity.” http://www.v2.nl/archive/works/antirom
[ http://www.antirom.com/

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Manuscript
Eric Lanz, 1994, http://www.ericlanz.net/
CD-Rom, Macromedia Director Apple QuickTime
Production: ZKM | Institute for Visual Media, 1994.

“A text, displayed in a linear way but made out of visual characters of tools, is activated by a mouse-click on an icon and plays back a four second video sequence with the actual use of the tool. The title refers to the iconography of each letter as well as to the origin of language in so far as it is related to manufactured objects, i.e. here a page ‹written› by hand and set in motion by the user’s hand.”
Rudolf Frieling – http://at.zkm.de/node/270

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Cyberflesh Girlmonster
Linda Dement, CD-Rom 1995, http://www.lindadement.com/
Australian Network for Art and Technology, Australian Film Commission

“Donated body parts collected during Artists’ Week of the Adelaide Festival 1994 have been used to construct a computer based interactive work. About 30 women participated in the original event by scanning their chosen flesh and digitally recording a sentence or sound. Conglomerate bodies were created from the information donated. These have been animated and made interactive. When a viewer clicks on one of these monsters, the words attached to that body part could be heard or seen, another monster may appear, a digital video could play, a story or medical information about the physical state described by the story, may be displayed. The user moves relatively blindly between these. There is no menu system or clear controllable interface. The work is a macabre, comic representation of monstrous femininity from a feminist perspective that encompasses revenge, desire and violence.[...]” http://www.v2.nl/archive/works/cyberflesh-girlmonster  http://www.newmediacaucus.org/html/journal/issues/html_only/2006_spring/Sp06_Davis.htm

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User Unfriendly Interface
Josephine Starrs & Leon Cmielewski, first exhibited 1994, CD-Rom published 1996. http://lx.sysx.org/
Produced with the assistance of the Australian Film Commission

User Unfriendly Interface, CD ROM/Installation on themes of conspiracy theories, male vs female concept of space, dating services, mens issues & personality testing. 1997 Video Positive, Liverpool, UK “Since 1994 we have collaborated on a variety of new media arts projects that incorporate interactivity and play as strategies for engaging with the social and political contradictions inherent in contemporary society. Audience engagement is a vital element in our interactive artworks. We sometimes think of our work as performance art, were the artist is not physically present; the actions of the performer are programmed into the work, with the viewers’ response completing the piece. We have closely observed how viewers interact with our work, and have drawn on these observations in the creation of each subsequent piece. [...]”http://scan.net.au/scan/journal/display.php?journal_id=100

 

 

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September 24th, 2012 at 4:27 pm

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Street Memories

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September 18th, 2012 at 8:11 pm

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Visiting Artist

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(Thx for the flowers KATSU!! :)

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September 4th, 2012 at 1:22 pm

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BBC podcast – Interview

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‘Art, dance and unidentifiable cities’ - bbc.co.uk/blogs/outriders

“..From walking around with paper models of over sized World of Warcraft weapons to planting giant replicas of Google map pins in real locations – Artist Aram Bartholl is interested in exploring the boundaries between offline and online worlds. He’s just completed a new work – DVD Dead Drop at New York’s Museum of the Moving Image – and so Chris asked him what he was trying to achieve through his art…”

25min podcast – Mp3 link

 

 

 

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August 30th, 2012 at 11:52 am

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Written by Aram

August 22nd, 2012 at 8:48 pm

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0dayart

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OHH NOO! 0dayart.net  STOLE the HOT show (on DVD) and is seeding it now ILLEGALY on the INTERNT! thepiratebay.se/torrent/7542702 ;) Love the picture @nullsleep!! THX!!

Project page DVD Dead Drop

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August 21st, 2012 at 9:22 am

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DVD Dead Drop THX!!

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flickr set

The DVD Dead Drop opening last week at MMI was awesome! Thx to everyone for showing up!! Thx to all the artist participating in the first show ‘HOT‘!
Thx to MMI staff for dedicated production and support! Thx to Jonas Lund for code! And special shoutout to Jason Eppink at MMI for making all this happen!

Project page DVD Dead Drop

 

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August 20th, 2012 at 5:37 pm

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Night & Day

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Written by Aram

August 16th, 2012 at 6:33 am

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(everything ready to launch! CU on Thursday!)

Project page DVD Dead Drop

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August 14th, 2012 at 2:44 am

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HOT

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HOT
A group show about video that is not video
Curated by Aram Bartholl
Served on DVD through the DVD Dead Drop install at the Museum of Moving Image, NYC
Opening reception Thursday, August 16, 6:00–8:00 p.m.
Acessible to the public 24/7 , August 16–September 15, 2012

Participating artists:
0100101110101101.org (Eva & Franco Mattes), Constant Dullaart, Curating YouTube (Robert Sakrowski), Joel Holmberg, JODI, JK Keller, Olia Lialina, Jonas Lund, Rosa Menkman, Katja Novitskova, Niko Princen, Casey Reas, Evan Roth, Andrew Salomone, Borna Sammak, UBERMORGEN.COM

Curator’s Statement:

“If it had been possible to distribute video online from day one, there would be no Web as we know it today. Instead, during the long wait for shareable online video, artists developed a distinctive language that we still value today, applying clever montages, modular visuals constructed form reusable, repeatable elements, and minimal activity…”
—Olia Lialina (2010). “Early Experiments Online,” article published on ‘The Take,’ at Guggenheim.org

Technological developments over the last three decades have generated a vast range of production and distribution methods for the moving image that have significantly deconstructed the linearity of film and video. The rapidly changing landscape of the web, code, vectors, 2D, 3D, games, glitches, and GIFs has profoundly influenced the way we perceive video today. Works produced by these new processes and software tools often have very little in common with traditional video: some are closer to paintings, some loop in micro movies, and others exploit system faults. Many of these moving images are software processes that result in a wide range of visualizations, and a lot of them exist in single frames, code-generated vectors, manipulated computer games, or screencasts of operating systems.

The moving image has been hacked, transformed, and infiltrated from multiple directions and digital sources, but over the last ten years it also conquered the Internet. The show HOT represents a wide range of artistic positions analyzing, reinterpreting, and deconstructing the moving image. New and classic works from well-established digital artists will be served to a public hot on silver disc 24/7.

DVD Dead Drop
Made possible by the Harpo Foundation, with support from the Consulate General of the Federal Republic of Germany, New York.

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Project page DVD Dead Drop

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August 11th, 2012 at 4:56 pm

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